Tips on Texas Holdem Strategy

Texas Holdem is a game of perception. If you have a big hand you want your opponents to think you have nothing so you can get more money out of them and if you have nothing you want them to think you have the best hand possible. Well, your position that you are sitting in at the poker table contributes to your overall perception as well. Sometimes it’s a positive contribution and sometimes it’s a negative contribution. So before you make your next bet in a Texas Holdem poker game, you may want to take a look around the table and recognize all the factors before you bet.

On the Button

Being on the button means that you have the dealer button in front of you. Traditionally this is the most powerful position to be in at the table. The reason this position is so powerful is that the person that is on the button is the last player to act after the flop is shown. You can see how this would be an enviable position because you get to see what everyone else is doing before you decide what you are going to do.

Many times a poker player that is on the button will have the opportunity to steal the blinds as well. This happens when there is no action on the table (everyone in front of you has folded) and the only players left in the hand are the player that is on the button and the big and small blinds. In this particular situation, it may be a good idea to test the players in the blind positions by raising on the button. The object of doing this is to have the players in the blind positions fold their hands without seeing the flop. It is good poker strategy to try to steal the blinds whether you are holding a good hand or not. Once again, poker is all about perception.

In the Blinds

If you are in either the big blind position or in the small blind position, you are traditionally called “out of position”. This position is called out of position because it is the weakest position to be in because you are the first to act once the flop is shown. If you are playing a hand while in one of the blind positions just keep in mind that you are the first to act and an experienced poker player will know how to exploit this information.

You can also choose to use the big or small blind positions to your advantage. As mentioned earlier, the blind positions are traditionally the weakest players at the table because they are the first to act once the flop is displayed. Some poker players think differently. Some players think that the first person to act has the first chance to bet and that is a good thing. An aggressive player will take advantage of this opportunity even if they have missed the flop completely.

Hint:

When you are in the blind positions, try to utilize the continuation bet. This is a great tool that experienced poker players use at the right time in order to collect pretty sizable pots. If you are in one of the blinds and a number of people are in the hand but no one has raised the pot, what you would do is raise the pot a significant amount (maybe 3-5 times the big blind) in order to get rid of any of the marginal hands that might still exist. Let’s say you get one or two people that call. Since you are first to act, you would use this to your advantage by placing another significant bet after the flop is displayed. This will immediately get your opponents to think that you have some type of huge hand like two aces or two kings. Usually, if the others hit nothing on the flop they will gracefully lay their hands down. Once again, you can do this with any type of hand because the perception is that your hand is huge.

The Ultimate Texas Hold Em Strategy That Makes You Money Automatically

The Ultimate Texas Hold Em Strategy is simple and effective and works in any game; no limit, limit, tournaments and cash games. Read this article now to discover how you can use these ultimate strategy tactics to dominate at your next game.

The game of poker has been around for some time now. There are countless variants of poker with slight changes in the way the game is played. Texas Poker is the most popular form of poker right now. Although the same rules apply to different forms of poker, each game requires a different strategy.

Texas Poker has different variations as. No limit requires a different approach, then set limit. The same applies to the limit and pot limit games. Strategies for Texas Hold Em tournament are also different to game formats in cash.

The Ultimate Texas Hold Em Strategy concept remains the same throughout the many different variations of poker. I’m not going to reveal the whole strategy to you right now – there isn’t enough space on this page – but I can give you a taste of what’s in it.

Ultimate Texas Hold Em Strategy Secret #1

Fold when you are beaten

Shares of basic poker are still intact, no matter what game you play format. The action that most players have difficulty performing is folding.

Your goal should be to lie when you’re holding the losers and milk your opponents when you have the nuts (best possible hand). It sounds easy and simple, but it is very difficult to follow for the beginning of many players and even advance.

Many players have the incorrect misconception that the hard part knows when they have the best or worst hand. It’s not and this is generally easy. The hard part is having the diligence to put your cards down and slide them forward.

Ultimate Texas Hold Em Strategy Secret #2

Limit the percentage of hands played

Novice players often play a many hands distributed to them – thinking that all hands have a chance to win. It is a fatal error. While 72o (the worst hand in poker) has been called to strike the head upside AA occasionally, the real chances of this happening are slim compared to the number of times that AA will victorious against 72.

So if you play hands like losing 72, you will not doubt be a loser in the long term. Now, this starts to get especially true for other hands you are more likely to play. Again, diligence.

These two strategies will contact you to any form of Texas Poker you decide to play. They are the foundation for playing winning poker in any form.

Texas Hold Em Strategy – Best Strategies That Never Fail

When you are developing your master Texas Hold Em Strategy you want to make sure you are using only foolproof tactics. Discover 3 strategies that never fail.

Texas Hold Em Strategy That Never Fails #1

The best strategy that will always bring success is to play great cards! This is known as playing tight. Tight players rock in my opinion.

One of the first things to do when you are playing poker is to make sure you are playing great hole cards. This will increase your chances of winning, and increase your chances of landing awesome hands (which always feel good).

Tight strategies will never fail. Loose strategies on the other hand have high failure rates.

Texas Hold Em Strategy That Never Fails #2

The next best strategy to use that is a surefire way towards success is an aggressive betting strategy. And I meant aggressive.

Your profits in poker can be directly attributed to the level of aggression you display at the poker table. All the best players in the world are aggressive.

The fact of the matter is you simply cannot win playing passive. You might do okay here and there but you’ll never be in control of your profits.

The cards you play to back-up this aggression will really depend on your level of skill and risk profile. I’d suggest play tight if you are a new or beginner player.

Texas Hold Em Strategy That Never Fails #3

The most foolproof strategy – if you take time to learn it – is using pot odds and outs to guarantee your success. This strategy involves using pure probability to make sure that the odds are in your favor.

If you have a $100 pot and must pay $50 to play, you need to win 2 times to every time you lose. This means your odds are 2:1. Therefore you need cards that have a 33% chance of winning, because you will lose 2 games and win 1 game.

This is an example of basic pot odds. Players using these tactics will guarantee that they profit over the long-term because they are always making sure that they are winning more than they lose. Simple.

I bet it’s no wonder that if you combine all three of these Texas Hold Em strategies together and play tight aggressive to your odds you are practically guaranteed to always win. In fact, this is the best strategy I advise anyone who is new or beginner to play.

It’s actually very easy to play too, because there is no grey lines, it’s a very black and white strategy. Either you bet or you fold. Simple.

Texas Holdem Poker Tournament Strategy – Starting Hands

Welcome to the fifth in my Texas Holdem Poker Strategy Series, focusing on no limit Texas Holdem poker tournament play and associated strategies. In this article, we’ll examine starting hand decisions.

It may seem obvious, but deciding which starting hands to play, and which ones to skip playing, is one of the most important Texas Holdem poker decisions you’ll make. Deciding which starting hands to play begins by accounting for several factors:

* Starting Hand “groups” (Sklansky made some good suggestions in his classic “Theory of Poker” book by David Sklansky)

* Your table position

* Number of players at the table

* Chip position

Sklansky originally proposed some Texas Holdem poker starting hand groups, which turned out to be very useful as general guidelines. Below you’ll find a “modified” (enhanced) version of the Sklansky starting hands table. I adapted the original Sklansky tables, which were “too tight” and rigid for my liking, into a more playable approach that are used in the Poker Sidekick poker odds calculator. Here’s the key to these starting hands:

Groups 1 to 8: These are essentially the same scale as Sklansky originally proposed, although some hands have been shifted around to improve playability and there is no group 9.

Group 30: These are now “questionable” hands, hands that should be played rarely, but can be reasonably played occasionally in order to mix things up and keep your opponents off balance. Loose players will play these a bit more often, tight players will rarely play them, experienced players will open with them only occasionally and randomly.

The table below is the exact set of starting hands that Poker Sidekick uses when it calculates starting poker hands. If you use Poker Sidekick, it will tell you which group each starting hand is in (if you can’t remember them), along with estimating the “relative strength” of each starting hand. You can just print this article and use it as a starting hand reference.

Group 1: AA, KK, AKs

Group 2: QQ, JJ, AK, AQs, AJs, KQs

Group 3: TT, AQ, ATs, KJs, QJs, JTs

Group 4: 99, 88, AJ, AT, KQ, KTs, QTs, J9s, T9s, 98s

Group 5: 77, 66, A9s, A5s-A2s, K9s, KJ, KT, QJ, QT, Q9s, JT, QJ, T8s, 97s, 87s, 76s, 65s

Group 6: 55, 44, 33, 22, K9, J9, 86s

Group 7: T9, 98, 85s

Group 8: Q9, J8, T8, 87, 76, 65

Group 30: A9s-A6s, A8-A2, K8-K2, K8-K2s, J8s, J7s, T7, 96s, 75s, 74s, 64s, 54s, 53s, 43s, 42s, 32s, 32

All other hands not shown (virtually unplayable).

So, those are the enhanced Sklasky Texas Holdem poker starting hand tables.

The later your position at the table (dealer is latest position, small blind is earliest), the more starting hands you should play. If you’re on the dealer button, with a full table, play groups 1 through 6. If you’re in middle position, reduce play to groups 1 through 3 (tight) and 4 (loose). In early position, reduce play to groups 1 (tight) or 1 through 2 (loose). Of course, in the big blind, you get what you get.

As the number of players drops into the 5 to 7 range, I recommend tightening up overall and playing far fewer, premium hands from the better positions (groups 1 – 2). This is a great time to forget about chasing flush and straight draws, which puts you at risk and wastes chips.

As the number of players drops to 4, it’s time to open up and play far more hands (groups 1 – 5), but carefully. At this stage, you’re close to being in the money in a Texas Holdem poker tournament, so be extra careful. I’ll often just protect my blinds, steal occasionally, and try to let the smaller stacks get blinded or knocked out (putting me into the money). If I’m one of the small stacks, well, then I’m forced to pick the best hand I can get and go all-in and hope to double-up.

When the play is down to 3, it’s time to avoid engaging with big stacks and hang on to see if we can land 2nd place, heads-up. I tend to tighten up a bit here, playing very similar to when there’s just 3 players (avoiding confrontation unless I’m holding a pair or an Ace or a King, if possible).

Once you’re heads-up, well, that’s a topic for a completely different article, but in general, it’s time to become extraordinarily aggressive, raise a lot, and become “pushy”.

In tournaments, it’s always important to keep track of your chips stack size relative to the blinds and everyone else’s stacks. If you’re short on chips, then play far fewer hands (tigher), and when you do get a good hand, extract as many chips as you can with it. If you’re the big stack, well, you should avoid unnecessary confrontation, but use your big stack position to push everyone around and steal blinds occasionally as well – without risking too many chips in the process (the other players will be trying to use you to double-up, so be careful).

Well, that’s a quick overview of an improved set of starting hands and some general rules for adjusting starting hand play based upon game conditions throughout the tournament.

Until next time, best of luck to you at the Texas Holdem poker tables!

Rick