Heisman Odds – Big 12 Quarterbacks Dominate Odds

Using the odds at Malversports as a barometer, it appears as if Florida Gators’ Tim Tebow has some significant work to do if he is going to become the first player to win back to back Heisman Trophy awards since Archie Griffin way back in 1975. The lefthanded run-happy quarterback entered the 2008 campaign as Malvernsports’ 3-1 favorite to have his name called out at the Downtown Athletic Club on December 15th.

Currently paying out at 7-1, Tebow has some work to do in order to add a second Heisman to his trophy case. Overall his numbers are down from last years personal offensive barrage; however, his stats are still quite impressive tallying 19 passing and 11 rushing touchdowns so far. The fact that the Gators are the favorties (+160) to win the BCS National Championship and have absolutely destroyed everyone in their path since their only loss to Mississippi in late September, can’t hurt Tebow’s chances.

The three players that Malversports’ handicappers have ahead of the reigning Heisman owner all have a couple things in common; they are all quarterbacks and they all play in the pass happy Big 12 Conference. Texas Tech’s Graham Harrell and Oklahoma’s Sam Bradford are the current co-favorites paying out at +150; right on their heels is Texas Longhorns’ Colt McCoy (+300).

Coincidentally, the two favorites square off this weekend as Harrell’s Aggies travel to Norman Oklahoma to take on Bradford’s Sonners. This game is sure to have National Championship implications and the winning QB could very well separate himself from the pack in the Heisman running.

From a stats perspective, it is hard to distinguish a favorite from the three Big 12 signal callers. What all three have done is simply amazing considering they all play in the same conference. To even think that one of these three won’t even make the All Big 12 Second Team is unfathomable.

Through ten games, Harrell has 36 TDs to just 5 interceptions and has completed a staggering 71.7% of his passes. Meanwhile,Bradford has thrown for 38 scores to just 6 picks while completing almost 68% of his passes. Finally, McCoy has tossed 30 TDs, only 7 interceptions while completing a mind-boggling 77.2% of his passes.

With the 2008 College football regular season approaching its conclusion, be sure to log onto Malvernsports.com to check out the latest odds on who will win College Football’s most prestigious award. Also, be sure to do all your Bowl game betting with Malvernsports where you will be able to take advantage of “No Juice” on EVERY 2008 Bowl game.

Odds to win the Heisman Trophy:

Graham Harrell +150

Sam Bradford +150

Colt McCoy +300

Tim Tebow +700

Michael Crabtree +1000

Chase Daniels +2000

Max Hall +3000

Mark Sanchez +3000

Javon Ringer +4000

Knowshon Moreno +4000

Find more information and make wagers at the must trusted name in Online Sports – MalvernSports.com

Winning at Texas Hold'em – Is Knowing the Odds of Any Value?

You've read the books and articles where the poker writers state the odds of making certain hands. For example: making an open end (outside) straight draw is 5 to 1, a flush draw is 4.2 to 1, and a gutshot (inside) straight draw is 11 to 1. Playing Texas Hold'em there are many variations in the odds to be learned such as what's the difference in the odds if the next card is the turn (4th card) or the river (5th card)?

But let's look at the logic and math behind these calculations to determine if they are of any value to us as poker players. How are the odds of 5 to 1 calculated for an open end straight draw? To successfully complete the straight we need one of eight cards, four on either end of our four-card straight. How many cards remain unseen? We started with 52, 8 of them are useful to us and we see four of them in our partially completed straight. So, the experts say 52 minus 8 minus 4 leaves us with 40 unseen cards, which are of no value to us. Therefore 40 failures to 8 successes works out to 5 to 1 odds. And I say GARBAGE. Your actual odds could be much higher or much lower.

Let's say you're playing in a ring game with ten at the table. That means that twenty cards have been dealt plus three for the flop and one has been "burned" by the dealer. If all of the eight cards you need to complete a straight have already been dealt to other players, your chances of making your straight are ZERO, and your odds according to mathematicians are infinite. On the other hand, what happens if all of your eight cards remain in the pack the dealer is holding? The dealer holds 52 less 20 dealt to the players less 3 for the flop less 1 burned or 28 cards. So now calculate your odds: 20 cards that won't help and 8 cards that will, which works out to 2.5 to 1. Quite a difference!

Instead of flatly assuming that our odds of completing an outside straight are 5 to 1, we gamblers should think that our odds are between 2.5 to 1 and infinity, or just plain unknown. So in my opinion it's of little use to spend a lot of time learning the odds of making straights, flushes, sets, or quads.

So what's a poker player to do, aside from praying for a lot of luck? One answer is to realize that making some hands will be more difficult than others. Obviously it's harder to make a gutshot straight than an open ended straight. If we're going out on a limb to make a long-odds hand, we better be well rewarded if we make it. If there's not a lot of money in the pot, think twice about paying to draw to an inside straight.

Notice this analysis changes with head to head competition since fewer cards will be dealt to other players.