MIT Holdem Poker Count System Review

Are you looking to improve your Texas Holdem game? I know I am, and after reading many holdem poker guides on the internet, I’ve realized that many of them are very similar and are not very helpful. One very interesting poker system I’ve tried is the MIT Holdem Point Count System. In this review article, I plan to preview the contents of this system and tell you about my experience with this product.

MIT Holdem Point Count System

This system is written into a 7 chapter downloadable ebook, by Ray Seakan, a professional poker player with 18 years of experience. In the introduction, the author starts off by talking about himself and how he had firstly developed a blackjack system, before finally developing this poker point count system. I was personally quite impressed with the author, given the amount of work he had put into creating his system.

The guide then goes on to explain his system, and why it works fundamentally. After reading the explanation of why the system works, I became quite excited and convinced with this in-depth system. It decides for you your course of action based on mathematical percentages of each 2 card hand winning against a table of opponents. It is adjusted for table position, number of players and how many opponents fold ahead of you.

After taking all the above factors into consideration, you will arrive at a number of points. The points addition process is fully explained in the guide. It is 100% mechanical and requires no discretion on the user’s part. You do need to memorize the point count system if you do not play the e-book open.

Chapter 3 is the system counting rules. This is exactly where you’ll learn how to add points based on your table position, and then your hand strength. With your derived number of points, if it is below a certain number, you’ll fold. There are 3 other ranges of points that would determine whether you call or raise. Then it goes on to run through several useful examples to help you understand the system better.

Chapter 4 explains how to apply the point count system to blind hands. It provides very good rules to keep you out of trouble in blind positions. The rest of the chapters talk about advanced concepts of the MIT Holdem Point Count System.

Conclusion

After using the MIT Holdem Point Count System for several days, I would say that it has certainly helped me get more success with poker. Using the point count system, I have been stopped from playing hands that I might have played otherwise and lost in the end. It is also highly recommended that you do not adjust the point system, as I’ve had experiences whereby I adjusted the point system just to try and play more hands. Over the long run, I’ve concluded that it does not pay to do so.

Discipline is extremely vital to this system. The author clearly stresses this point in the final few chapters of the e-book.

Free Betfair Exchange Games Method for Texas Hold’em

How would you like a FREE Betfair Exchange Games Method for the Texas Hold’em game that would be like your online, unlimited ATM machine so that you could continue to profit on Betfair and build up a huge bank to use on other systems? Here it is! Read on and you will be given one of the simplest yet most effective methods for the Betfair Exchange Games.

Make sure you follow these instructions step-by-step and do not deviate from everything that is stated below:

1. Navigate on Betfair to the Texas Hold’em game that is under the Exchange Games category.

2. Watch a few rounds of the game. You may or may not notice that the hand that was favourite at the pre-flop is not very often the favourite at the end of the round and it is this concept that we will profit off of in order to build that huge bank.

3. After the pre-flop, you want to lay the hand with the lowest odds, provided that these odds are no higher than 2.8 – This is so that you can keep your liability down and your overall profit up.

4. Now, you will wait for the game to go to the flop where, what you want to happen is, the odds of the favourite you just laid have increased. This is where you will green up: Greening up simply put means that you ensure you have a profit no matter what outcome wins.

For example, if you laid a hand at 2.75 in the pre-flop and then, at the flop, you were able to back the same hand for 4.05 then you would do it as this would guarantee a profit no matter what hand would win.

When using this method, just remember the simple yet most useful phrase in the world of Betfair, online trading and online gambling: Remember to Back High and Lay Low. If you stick to this then you will be well on your way to making, A LOT, of money trading Betfair. Every time you go in for a new trade, just say that phrase over and over to yourself so that you know, for sure, that you will not make a mistake in your trading on the Betfair Exchange Games. And if, for some bizarre reason, people tell you otherwise, well simply do not listen to them whatsoever — It’ll get you in trouble.

The Most Important Concept in Texas Holdem Poker

Pot Odds

All the cards are out. There’s £100 in the pot, your opponent bets £50 and with your hand, you’ll win half the time. Do you call?

Yes, the pot is now £150, that’s your reward. It’s £50 for you to call, that’s the risk. The Reward is 3 times the risk. The call is 33% of the pot. That’s the percentage of showdowns you have to win to break even. It’s simple to see that if you won 50% of the time, it would be a profitable call. I’d call every time.

In this example, all the cards are out so you don’t have to worry that your opponent is on a draw. In these situations pot odds combined with your own hand strength will give you an idea of whether to call or fold.

We can use pot odds when there are still cards to go as well. Suppose you have a nut flush draw on the flop and position. The pot is $30. First position leads out with a bet of $20. Two players call after him. The pot is now $90, its $20 for you to call. The call is 22% of the pot. You have a 17% chance of hitting your flush on the turn. Pot Odds say fold.

Just to be clear, pot odds influence every stage of poker. Here’s a preflop example of how to totally misplay a hand;

-You are big blind

-You have pocket aces

-You have $100

-The blinds are $1/2

-First position raises to $10

-3 callers

-The pot is 43

-8 more for you to call

-You raise 10

-It’s $10 for 1st position to call into a $61

-16% of the pot

The odds get better for every player. This effect is called the umbrella effect, when one players call makes the pot odds better for the next player and so on, calls by early position players encourage late position callers. You could call it the domino effect.

-They all call

-The pot is now $103

-Flop comes 4 7 9

-You bet strongly at the flop

-That means all in for $82

-You get called and beaten with a set

How to play it:

Raise at least $35. This would have given the first player 40% pot odds to call. However he would have been well behind to my Aces (at best 10.8% to hit a set on the flop) and since I am guaranteed to lead out strongly, this would have been a losing decision for him.

In this situation, when considering how strongly to re-raise, it is important to consider the size of the total pot in relation to the players stack sizes at the table. If you have aces and get a short stacked player to call into a pot roughly the same size as his stack and then check to him, he may push all in as a bluff, so you would be willing to let him see the flop to be able to stack him.

So remember to always relate the size of the bet or re-raise to the size of the pot!! Happy poker.

Objectives of Poker and How to Play Texas Holdem

Poker is probably the most popular of all card games in existence, thanks in part to an exciting format, huge sums of money that is regularly on offer, and the swings and roundabouts that come with a game with an element of luck. Even with an element of luck, playing winning poker takes a good amount of skill and some time to master. This guide will take you through some of the basics poker rules and also more generally, how to play poker.

First of all, let’s consider what the objectives of poker are in a game of poker. The objective of most is to win money. To do that, players would need to eithermake it to showdown with the best 5 card hand OR force everyone else out of the hand, thus winning the pot. Most games are played against the same standard ranking of hands however, there are a few variants that use slight variations to this standard. For this article we will focus on Texas Hold’em mainly as it’s the most popular game and a good place to start out as a new player.

Texas Hold’em

Texas Hold’em is the party favourite and carries the most traffic, both live and online. It is the game that is featured in most major poker tournaments or televised cash games.

It’s known as a community card game for the reason that there are shared cards that are used by all players, when trying to make their best 5 card hand. In short, each player will get two private cards, dealt face down, better known as hole cards. These cards are only seen by the player they are dealt to. Throughout the game there will be a number of betting rounds and 5 community or shared cards that will be dealt. These cards are dealt face up. Players will try to make the best 5 card hand using any combination of the 7 available cards to them (2 private cards and 5 shared cards). This same principle applies across all poker games.

Something that makes the game really unique is that a player doesn’t have to have the best hand to win. Imagine you’ve got ten people and gave them one card each and told them to race up a hill. The person who got up there would be first, automatically winning. If there was a tie, the two players would hold up the card they were given and the highest card would win. Poker is similar in principle. The player who stays in the hand all the way and has the best hand would take down the pot. If there is only one person who makes it up the hill or who stays in the hand, they would be the winner, regardless of the card or hand they held. So if only one made it to the top of the hill, he would win, no matter his hand.

Structure of the Game

Ok, let’s look at how the game is actually played. When starting a game, it’s normal for each player to be dealt a card. The highest card gets the dealer button or button. The button acts as an indicator as to who is dealt cards first, and also who posts the blinds. The blinds are automatic bets that are made to ensure each pot has some money to play for (or there would be no incentive to play anything but the top hands). The blinds consist of two automatic bets, the small blind, posted by the player to the immediate left of the button, and the big blind, the player two seats to the left of the button. The small blind is usually half of the value of the big blind. Once these bets are posted, all players are dealt 2 cards face down.

Players will now need to decide whether to play the hand or not, starting with the player to the left of the big blind (or 3 left of the dealer button). This would, in large, be down to the two cards the player has been dealt (although there are other factors which I will cover separately). A player has the choice to call, fold or raise. Here are definitions for each action:

Fold– to throw your cards into the muck and take no further part in the hand. By doing so, you lose your stake in the pot.

Call– to match the highest bet made so far. If the highest bet is the big blind, then that must be matched to stay in the hand. If a player raises, all other players will need to ‘call the raise’ or match it, to stay in the hand.

Raise– this would be a bet that would be more than the big blind and a sign of strength (a good hand). If a player was to raise and all other players folded, he will win the pot by default, regardless of the strength of his hand.

So play moves clockwise around the table until all players have either called, raised or folded.

Once all players have completed this initial betting round, the first three community or shared cards are dealt. These are dealt face up on the table. The first 3 cards dealt in Hold’em are known as ‘the flop’. All shared cards that are dealt are known as board cards or referred to as ‘the board’. At this stage, players will be trying to assemble their best 5 card hand from the 2 in their hand and the 3 on the board. Some players might already have made their hand and others might need cards, still to come, to make their hand. Either way, with 2 shared cards still to come, players will have a good indication as to the strength of their holding and their chances of hitting one of the cards they may need.

A second betting round now takes place and again players, moving clockwise, have the choice to fold their cards, call or raise. Once this betting round is complete, a fourth community card is dealt face up, otherwise known as ‘the turn’, ‘the turn card’ or ‘fourth street’. There is then a third betting round with all remaining players and then a fifth and final card (known as ‘fifth street’ or the ‘river card’) is dealt to the board, again face up (all shared cards are dealt face up). There is one final found of betting, conducted in the same manner as the previous rounds, and then the showdown.

During each betting round, it is usual for some players to fold their hand, either as the betting is too much for the strength of hand they have, or they fail to hit their cards needed to make a strong hand. At showdown, any player left in the hand would turn over their hole cards to reveal their hand. The best 5 card poker hand wins the pot (which would be a collection of blinds and all bets).

Key additional Points

– If all players fold, leaving one player in the hand, the hand ends there and the remaining player wins the hand.

– If a player is all in (.i.e. has bet all his available chips, he would only be able to win the same amount that had been wagered from each player in the hand). If players who had more than the all-in player continued to bet, a side pot would be formed.

– If two players have the same hand at showdown, the winner is determined by the best kicker. For instance if player 1 has the hand A-A-2-3-4 and player 2 had A-A-2-3-8, both players would have a pair of aces but player 2 would have the next highest card, the 8 (compared with player 1 who’s next highest is a 4). Ace is the highest kicker possible.

Tips on Texas Holdem Strategy

Texas Holdem is a game of perception. If you have a big hand you want your opponents to think you have nothing so you can get more money out of them and if you have nothing you want them to think you have the best hand possible. Well, your position that you are sitting in at the poker table contributes to your overall perception as well. Sometimes it’s a positive contribution and sometimes it’s a negative contribution. So before you make your next bet in a Texas Holdem poker game, you may want to take a look around the table and recognize all the factors before you bet.

On the Button

Being on the button means that you have the dealer button in front of you. Traditionally this is the most powerful position to be in at the table. The reason this position is so powerful is that the person that is on the button is the last player to act after the flop is shown. You can see how this would be an enviable position because you get to see what everyone else is doing before you decide what you are going to do.

Many times a poker player that is on the button will have the opportunity to steal the blinds as well. This happens when there is no action on the table (everyone in front of you has folded) and the only players left in the hand are the player that is on the button and the big and small blinds. In this particular situation, it may be a good idea to test the players in the blind positions by raising on the button. The object of doing this is to have the players in the blind positions fold their hands without seeing the flop. It is good poker strategy to try to steal the blinds whether you are holding a good hand or not. Once again, poker is all about perception.

In the Blinds

If you are in either the big blind position or in the small blind position, you are traditionally called “out of position”. This position is called out of position because it is the weakest position to be in because you are the first to act once the flop is shown. If you are playing a hand while in one of the blind positions just keep in mind that you are the first to act and an experienced poker player will know how to exploit this information.

You can also choose to use the big or small blind positions to your advantage. As mentioned earlier, the blind positions are traditionally the weakest players at the table because they are the first to act once the flop is displayed. Some poker players think differently. Some players think that the first person to act has the first chance to bet and that is a good thing. An aggressive player will take advantage of this opportunity even if they have missed the flop completely.

Hint:

When you are in the blind positions, try to utilize the continuation bet. This is a great tool that experienced poker players use at the right time in order to collect pretty sizable pots. If you are in one of the blinds and a number of people are in the hand but no one has raised the pot, what you would do is raise the pot a significant amount (maybe 3-5 times the big blind) in order to get rid of any of the marginal hands that might still exist. Let’s say you get one or two people that call. Since you are first to act, you would use this to your advantage by placing another significant bet after the flop is displayed. This will immediately get your opponents to think that you have some type of huge hand like two aces or two kings. Usually, if the others hit nothing on the flop they will gracefully lay their hands down. Once again, you can do this with any type of hand because the perception is that your hand is huge.